Sunday, 29 March 2015

Preseeding installations

In early February, I completed a move from Canonical's Phonedations team to the Foundations team. Part of this new work means debugging a lot of different failure cases in the installer, grub, and other early boot or low-level sofware, some of which requiring careful reproduction steps and probably quite a few install runs in VMs on on hardware.

Given the number of installations I do I've started to keep around preseed files; the text files used to configure automatic installations. I've made them available at http://people.canonical.com/~mtrudel/preseed/ so that they can be reused as necessary. Most of these preseed files make heavy use of the network to get the installation data and packages from the web, so they will need to be tweaked for use in an isolated network. They are annotated enough that it should be possible for anyone to improve on them to suit their own needs. I will add to these files as I run across things to test and automate. I hope we can use some of them soon in new automated QA tests where appropriate, so that it can help catch regressions.

For those not familiar with preseeding, these files can be used and referred to in the installation command-line when starting from a network PXE boot or a CDROM or pretty much any other installation medium. They are useful to tell the installer how you want the installation to be done without having to answer all of the individual questions one by one in the forms in ubiquity or debian-installer. The installer will read the preseed file and use these answers without showing the prompts. This also means some of the files I make available should not be used lightly, as they will happily wipe disks without asking. You've been warned :)

To use this, you'll want to specify "preseed/file=/path/to/file" (or just file=) for a file directly accessible as a file system or through TFTP, or "preseed/url=http://URI/to/file" (or just url=) if it's available using HTTP. On d-i installs, this means you may also need to add "auto=true priority=critical" to avoid having to fill in language settings and the like (since the preseeds are typically only read after language, country, and network have been configured); and on ubiquity installs (for example, using a CD), you'll want to add 'only-ubiquity automatic-ubiquity' to the kernel command-line, again to keep the automated, minimal look and feel.

I plan on writing another entry soon on how to debug early boot issues in VMs or hardware using serial. Stay tuned.

2 comments:

Philipp Gassmann said...

You can also fully automate crypted lvm setup, including passphrase:

#if $encrypted == 1
# crypto with preseeded passphrase
d-i partman-auto/method string crypto
d-i partman-crypto/passphrase password $disk_enc_pw
d-i partman-crypto/passphrase-again password $disk_enc_pw
#else
d-i partman-auto/method string lvm
#end if

I use this to fully automate desktop setup. The passphrase is replaced when the user configuration happens.

Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre said...

Of course. The reason it's not in the crypto preseed was that it was used to test the behavior of ubiquity when the passphrase isn't preseeded; and it should be properly prompted to the user. Thanks for sharing the snippet, this is useful for people who may want to use the files as a basis for a full preseeded install.